The Great Moscow New Year Lights Walk 2015

There are, I am finding, one or two differences between Moscow and London.

Take Christmas decorations. In London, the most interesting ones are done by the people trying to entice you into their shops to buy their wares and in Moscow, there aren’t any.

This is because in the Soviet Union, under the communists, Christmas was banned. Or at least energetically discouraged. So, in an interesting reversal of what the Christians did to the Pagan midwinter festivals, everybody celebrates New Year instead in a way which is almost entirely like the Christmases of elsewhere. Christmas trees? Are New Year trees. But otherwise largely indistinguishable. Father Christmas? Is Ded Moroz (Grandfather Frost), ably assisted by his granddaughter, Snegurochka¬†(the Snow Maiden). Traditional television that everybody looks forward to? It’s no Doctor Who Christmas Special, but it exists. Family dining on an epic scale? Yes, got that, although it happens at midnight on 31st. And yes, everybody suffers through the leftovers for the next ten days too. There are even traditional sporting events the day after the big day. Swimming in ice holes mostly. Natch.

So what you are seeing when you walk around Moscow in the second half of December, are actually New Year decorations. Any insidious Christmas creep – the markets which spring up tend to be called Christmas markets, which is not surprising as they are as much of a blatant rip off of the same European phenomenon as they are in the UK – is dampened by the fact that the Orthodox celebration of the birth of Jesus is on 7th January. It’s fighting a losing battle is expecting people to delay gratification that long.

It’s not all pillaging from the West though. Mama was bemused by the sheer number of monkey themed items in all the shops this year until she remembered that Russians like to add whatever the animal from the Chinese horoscope is coming up next to their celebrations, and to hell with the fact that the respective New Years don’t line up at all and it’s a different belief system altogether.

When you receive a Christmas card from Mama with a cavorting rat, cow or dragon in a Santa hat covered in snow on the front, do not be surprised.

Of course, all this means that my Superb Big Brother and I get three separate days of being given presents, as Mama and Papa try to cover all their cultural bases in one marathon blow out. Every now and again being bi-cultural has its advantages. For us children.

Anyway.

Following the wild success of our London Christmas Window Scavenger Hunt in 2014, Mama thought it would be fun to get into the Christ… New Y… seasonal spirit by seeing what central Moscow had to offer, especially now that most of it is pedestrianised and considerably less overflowing with manic Christmas shoppers given that the centre of Moscow is mostly home to extremely high-end retail emporiums, and also given that Moscow tends to go in for bread and circuses on an epic scale for every public holiday of note.

 

2016 lights at Lubyanka in Moscow
There are a number of these in various locations around Moscow. In case you forget what year comes after 2015 I guess.
Christmas Market Moscow 2015
One of the many bijou Christmas markets on every available square in the centre of Moscow.
Christmas trees and slush Moscow 2015
Moscow is going for a record in the number of Christmas trees (New Year trees) ever displayed by any capital city. Ditto, slush.
Yolka Christmas Tree Lubyanka Moscow
It’s a good thing much of Russia is still covered in forest. This is just a roundabout usually.
Yolka Christmas Tree on Manezh Moscow
This is the main Christmas tree (NEW YEAR TREE) on Manezh Square, right next to the Kremlin and behind Red Square.
Dancing at New Year Moscow Lights 2015
Dancing is also popular at New Year.
Dancing at New Year Moscow Lights Kissing 2015
As is, I dunno, kissing.
Giant Bauble on Manezh in the snow Moscow
The giant bauble has landed.
Giant blue bauble Manezh Moscow
It changes colour.
Giant multicoloured bauble on Manezh Moscow
Lots of different colours.
Historical Museum from the bauble Moscow
You can go inside the bauble and photograph the Historical Museum.
New Year floating lights Moscow
Flying saucers are also a traditional part of any Russian New Year celebration. The melting snow, not so much, but we sure enjoyed paddling in it.
Fairytale Castle Lights Moscow
This fairytale castle is in pieces all over Moscow. Mama recommends you check out the Bolshoi, which we didn’t due to having gotten damp in the rivers of melting snow and needing to be taken home by this point.
Street of stars New Year Moscow
This street is just pretty.
TsUM window New Year Moscow
TsUM gets into the spirit of Christmas (or New Year).
Russian Army Shop Window New Year Moscow
As does, and I kid you not here, the Red Army’s fashion outlet.
Hotel National Moscow New Year Window
The windows of the Hotel National are Mama’s favourite though.
Inside Detskii Mir Moscow at New Year
This is the inside of the former Detskii Mir (Children’s World), now the Central Children’s Shop (not the same ring to it – they should never have sold off the name). Fun to wander around, difficult to prise us out of without a tantrum.
Inside Gum at New Year Moscow
GUM, on the other hand, has a giant satsuma hanging from the roof.
2016 Lights Moscow Tverskaya
Hello 2016, here we come!
2016 Lights Moscow
Happy New Year! See you all again soon!

And finally…

This is what the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy has to say about how Mama will be celebrating.